Tag Archives: preachers of la

Preachers of LA stand with the Duggars…sort of


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When did preaching become entertainment?

When I grew up the preachers preached hard, worked up a sweat, christened babies, buried the dead and encouraged the living. They lived in the world of black and white, gray areas did not exist and living on the edge simply meant you were on your way to hell. These preachers were the pre-WWJD generation. For them it was not a question they already knew what he would do, say and they would tell you what he would say about your life. They were not right all the time, but they felt a calling on their lives. Their center stage was often at the front of a storefront. What made them bearable was they were sincere in their beliefs. They would come to the pulpit in their robes or their gray, blue, black or brown suits. Piety was often a way of life not just a word in the dictionary. Now we see preachers ready to strut and wait for their close ups. Preaching is big business. It’s lights, camera action. It’s about getting more in the door not necessarily getting more souls closer to the Great “I AM”. We are in the age of the Preachers of LA and soon to be released the Preachers of Detroit. We will see them flaunt their wealth as they spout well worn platitudes. It is a new day but is it a better day? Share your thoughts.

Donnie McClurkin gives his take on the Preachers of LA

The second season of “Preachers Of L.A.” is set to debut this week. Are you a fan of the show?

“I was very purposely silent last season, because four of the five of them I know. I am a pastor, I am a preacher, I am a Christian, I am a man who loves integrity and I was brought up and raised in a great home that taught me that what goes on in the home is not public knowledge. And it’s not good to air out … this depiction of people who we deem to be spiritual leaders and people who are supposed to be credible, and people who are supposed to be the strength in the community. We all have natural lives, every one of us, but there are certain things even in our natural lives that we don’t want our employees to see, we don’t want our friends to see. There are things that we keep hidden until we work them out. We would love the luxury of being absolutely transparent, but it will hurt the people who are looking up to us. Everyone’s entitled to it, but reality TV goes a little too far. And it goes too far especially when it deals with Christianity. With pastors carrying guns to mission work. Then my question is, “Why are you going? I thought you said that you had God? Isn’t God your protection?” And I think it’s more harm than good. Because if you have 1 million people viewing, that gives a bad depiction to 1 million people of the preachers who sacrificed every day and every week for the people. 99% of the preachers are not like that. Flossing their stuff and driving around in their Bentleys and Rolls Royce Phantoms, and living high on the hog. There’s no sin in that, but the Bible said all things are lawful, but it’s not always expedient. The servant lives better than the people he has called to serve. And that gives the wrong depiction

Read more at http://www.eurweb.com/2014/08/donnie-mcclurkin-on-touring-with-fred-hammond-michael-brown-and-reality-tv/#XvzcFHPfxU1IGqyL.99

TD Jakes says Preachers of LA is “Junk”

The premiere of Oxygen’s controversial docu-series, Preachers Of L.A., may have pulled in a record 1.1 million viewers, but one of the most influential Christian pastors in America, Bishop T.D. Jakes, holds a very low opinion of it. On Sunday morning, October 13 at the Potter’s House in Dallas, TX, Jakes dissed the reality show, calling it “junk” and distancing himself from the stars’ blinged-out images and flamboyance. ¬“Now, I know you been watching that junk on TV,” Jakes said, criticizing Preachers Of L.A. amid a plea for congregants and online viewers to sow a financial seed into his local ministry. “I want to tell you right now, not one dime of what you’re sowing right now will buy my suit. I want you to know my car is paid for. I want you to know I got my house on my own. I want you to know I’m not bling-blinging. I am not shake and bake. I had money when I came to Dallas and I plan to have some when I leave,” Jakes stated emphatically. “You did not buy what I got,” he continued. “I had it when I came here. You know I had it when I came here. The devil is a lie! I have sold enough books and produced enough movies. I don’t need your offering to pay for this little slimy suit. So I rebuke that spirit in the name of Jesus Christ.” That spirit Jakes referred to is one of criticism, cynicism and skepticism of mega pastors’ motives following the premiere of Preachers of L.A. that documents the lives of 6 larger-than-life personalities: Bishop Noel Jones, Deitrick Haddon, Bishop Clarence McClendon, Pastor Wayne Chaney, Bishop Ron Gibson, and Pastor Jay Haizlip. Bishop Clarence McClendon pictured with his wife Priscilla and the couple’s son inside the McClendon’s home, worth more than $7 million– the most expensive of all the pastors’ homes featured on Preachers Of L.A. The rich Christian pastors are not in any way shy about indulging their cravings for the finer things in life, gladly showing off their fancy cars, sprawling houses and opulent lifestyles that rival rappers and mainstream celebrities. No doubt, the Preachers of L.A. have built empires for themselves, but Jakes said, “We are going to build the Kingdom of God like we have always built the Kingdom of God.” Then, Jakes delivered the one-liner that sent the crowd into a frenzy. He said, “I’m not from L.A. I’m from Dallas!”Zinger. That verbal jab had Potter’s House attendees cheering loudly, slapping each other high-five and expressing approval of their leader’s strong commentary. Continuing to stick up for his own credibility, he added, “The people who have been here a while can go through my track record and prove when I said something, I did it. When we went after something, we bought it. When we wanted the land, we paid for it. When we wanted the school, we built it. When we went after this church we burned the mortgage on this church.” He also interjected, “You don’t do that kind of business being shake and bake and slimy and—shut up,” he abruptly interrupted and censored his own speech. “Woo! Pull the plug,” Jakes talked to himself openly, then shifted gears a bit, focusing on the accomplishments of the ministry, rather than the shortcomings of the ministers on TV. “So let the work I’ve done speak for me. You are sowing into good ground. And the 300 families that are employed in this ministry eat from this ministry, work in this ministry, and help us to produce the excellence that we do,” he explained. “The natives all over Kenya drink water because of this ministry. And the hospital in Nairobi survives because of this ministry.” The leader was set on making it clear that his ministry was focused on missions, not mansions; MegaCare (his humanitarian organization), not mega cars. “I do not need you to buy my car. I got this,” he said, pausing for an extended period.
Before moving on, Jakes told the congregation, “If you appreciate my straightforwardness, give God some praise.” Then, moments later, he expressed indignantly, “I’m a grown man, dog.”

EEW Magazine

Who will be watching the Preachers of LA?


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