Tag Archives: politics

Did Laura Ingraham go too far in her criticism of Jeb Bush?


Too far? Share your thoughts.

If you put yourself in harm’s way who is responsible for you?

Recently we have seen journalist and aid workers savagely killed in dangerous countries. In some cases the US has attempted to rescue the individuals, but is the US government responsible for protecting people who put themselves in harm’s way? Share your thoughts,

Rudy Giuliani says the President does not love America…why can’t he just disagree with him?

” I do not believe that the president loves America. He doesn’t love you. And he doesn’t love me. He wasn’t brought up the way you were brought up and I was brought up through love of this country.”-
– Former NYC Mayor Rudy Giuliani

Why can’t he simply disagree with the president? Why does he have to question his love of country? Share your thoughts.

Tammy Meyers, Las Vegas mom, hunted killer before he killed her… does this make a difference?

Last week we heard the tragic story of Tammy Meyers taking her daughter out for driving lessons when she encountered an aggressive driver. We were told he followed her home and shot her in the head. She subsequently died from her injuries, but we have now learned some new facts. She did encounter an aggressive driver but she returned home picked up her son who was armed with a gun and they went out looking for the driver. The driver after being pursued followed them and he did kill her. Does this change anything? Read the linked story and share your thoughts.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/mom-killed-road-rage-attack-gun-searched-suspect-article-1.2119553

Rev. Al and Sarah Palin on the SNL40 Red Carpet…Yes, Hell has Frozen Over

al and sarah
No words.

Guest Post by Leonce Gaiter, American History is Not Black History: Black History is Not America’s

Occasionally I feature guest writers, and this is one of those days. Please read it and feel free to share your thoughts.

As taught in mainstream culture, American history propagates this nation as the womb of freedom, justice, and liberty. There are American creation myths as exemplified by the “Founding Fathers.” There are founding documents as revered as biblical texts for their promise of “Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.” That is why the argument that ‘black history is American history’ is naïve to the point of insipidity. For most of this nation’s history, blacks were not ‘Americans.’ First, we were owned, and then we were barred from exercising the rights of citizenship. That’s why our history puts the lie to American history’s mainstream myths. Almost half of the delegates to the Constitutional Convention, some of whom wrote so eloquently of freedom, owned other men as slaves. For most of its history, this country profited immensely from forcibly denying us freedom and liberty, by keeping us in chains, and from our labor as sub-citizens. Our history puts the lie to America’s history as popularly told. Do we want to continue to teach our children black history through a white racial frame? That is the practical effect of stating, “black history is American history.” It states that the majority veil should be placed on the history that we teach our children. It states that we should forego the right that every other culture assumes—the right to teach our history from our own point-of-view, and to be the heroes of our own stories—and instead, subsume our history within the majority’s. It states that we do not have the right to express our rage at the barbarities we endured, for those are histories that the majority has little willingness to accept and examine, and for good reason: they put the lie to treasured American myths. To pronounce that “black history is American history” says that every black child should learn that after Vernon Dahmer’s home was firebombed in Mississippi and Dahmer died from his wounds, the outraged white community worked to rebuild the Dahmer home. It says that black children needn’t learn that in Brookhaven, Mississippi in 1955, Lamar Smith was shot dead on the courthouse lawn in broad daylight by a white man for the crime of organizing blacks to vote, and that the known killer was never indicted because, per the Southern Poverty Law Center, “no one would admit they saw a white man shoot a black man.” To say “black history is American history” approves the endless repetition of a Martin Luther King quote like: I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality… I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word.” It says black children needn’t bother with another strand of King’s thinking: “It is an unhappy truth that racism is a way of life for the vast majority of white Americans, spoken and unspoken, acknowledged and denied, subtle and sometimes not so subtle—the disease of racism permeates and poisons a whole body politic. To insist that black history is American history says that the majority should be allowed to use our history to paint themselves in the warmest light, but that we should not be allowed to do the same. The two are often mutually exclusive. To understand the challenges and triumphs of the American descendants of African slaves, it is imperative to understand that almost every aspect of the might of this nation was used to cripple us. To understand how far we’ve come, the battles we fought, the blood we shed and the triumphs and defeats we suffered, you must understand the weight of the spiked boot that was placed on our necks. To do that, you must indict America for crimes she would rather forget. American history is not black history, and our history is not America’s to dictate. Until we understand that, and begin teaching our history to ourselves in ways that serve our own cultural needs instead of the majority’s, we will continue to internalize this nation’s prejudices against us, instead of arming ourselves to appropriately demonize and deflect them.

Leonce Gaiter is a prolific African American writer and proud Harvard Alum. His writing has appeared in the NYTimes, NYT Magazine, LA Times, Washington Times, and Washington Post, and he has written two novels. His newly released novel, In the Company of Educated Men, (http://bit.ly/ZyqSuN) is a literary thriller with socio-economic, class, and racial themes.

BOOK LINKS

In the company of Educated Men

AMAZON: http://amzn.to/1v411Kj

B&N: http://bit.ly/1Eq5da0

APPLE: http://bit.ly/1CyF3jo

Steve Harvey says “I don’t care about slavery”…funny or just stupid?


Watch the clip and share your thoughts.

John McCain calls protesters “scum” was he justified?


What do you think? The protesters seem out of line but was John McCain justified in his response?

Mitt Romney is not used to hearing the word No

After his 2012 defeat Mitt Romney said he would not seek the presidency again. Well that was then and this is now and Romney is making some noise. He is considering another rodeo, but why? Is it his deep sense of country that makes him feel compelled to join the fray or is this a rich man not used to hearing the word no. None of know what is his motivation, but what I do know is this is the man that made the 47% comment. So while he is weighing his options please remember his words.

Was Atlanta Fire Chief fired for his Christian faith?

Read the linked story and share your thoughts.

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2015/01/07/atlanta-fire-chief-was-fired-because-my-christian-faith/

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