Tag Archives: MSNBC

The President’s policies will help the young but what if you are not?

Last night the president shared his vision for the country. He was upbeat and full of hope. He is a fiftysomething man with a bright future, but what about the rest of the fiftysomething crowd are they experiencing this same kind of euphoria? Sadly in many cases the answer would be no. This morning I was speaking to a friend of mine who lost her well paying job about 5 years ago. Since that time she has only be able to find part time jobs because if you were born pre-1961 you are viewed as old and no one wants to hire the old. Sure the old have wisdom, experience and knowledge, but they also don’t come cheap. So what do you do? Do you keep sending resumes in knowing the computer program scans the resume and you are eliminated without a human being actually looking at the resume? Isn’t that the definition of insanity? Doing the same thing and expecting different results? What do you do when you are also looking at the distinct possibility that you are going to have to assist aging parents? Last night the president profiled a family that had weathered hard times and come out on the other side but they were young. If you are 30something you’ve got time on your side, but if you are 50something you do not have the luxury of time. You try to hold on to hope and take comfort in the president’s statements but it is not easy. I would have to ask the president to not be too hasty in turning that page. Many people are still laboring in the last chapter, and sadly some have even been edited out of the book. So Mr. President you too are a member of the AARP generation, and it would truly be sad if you not only turned the page, but turned your back on members of your own generation.

Church cancels lesbian’s funeral 15 minutes before it was to start…were they wrong?

I first saw this story on Twitter. I found the link below. Church cancels the funeral because they objected to one of the images to be shown on a video presentation. The decedant was shown proposing to her wife. The family refused to remove the image so the church said you can’t have the funeral here. Were they right? Well you have to ask why wasn’t the tape reviewed earlier? You also would have to ask What Would Jesus Do? Would he have turned a grieving family out of the temple? The church definitely has a right to their own beliefs but why didn’t they use this as an opportunity to minister? They could have expressed their opposition to the lifestyle without dismissing the family. Share your thoughts.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2015/01/13/colorado-church-denies-funeral-for-lesbian-woman/21709363/

Is McDonald’s new commercial tasteful or tacky?


Watch the commercial and share your thoughts.

Is there a problem? That Scary Brown Man & White Privilege

Very interesting article. Share your thoughts.
http://www.tinyurl.com/kkpya3n

Was Atlanta Fire Chief fired for his Christian faith?

Read the linked story and share your thoughts.
http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2015/01/07/atlanta-fire-chief-was-fired-because-my-christian-faith/

Mario Cuomo, former New York governor, dead at 82


Vintage Mario Cuomo appearing at the 1984 Democratic convention.

Did Majority whip Steve Scalise know that he was speaking to a white supremacist group?

Read the linked story and share your thoughts.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-politics/wp/2014/12/30/former-kkk-leader-says-his-political-adviser-was-friendly-with-rep-scalise/?hpid=z2

Is torture necessary to insure our freedom?

Yesterday as I was watching the reporters scurry around and tell us the Senate’s findings on our torture program I thought of the movie A Few Good Men. We value our freedom in this country but freedom comes at a cost, and often that cost is not pretty. Torture is not pretty as a matter of fact it is downright cruel, but we experienced cruelty on September 11, 2001. When three planes targeted our citizens and killed 3,000 people. We can not follow a rulebook when the enemy does not respect the book. Our government is committed to safeguarding our safety and our freedom, and to take them to task years later is wrong and smacks of politics. We want thm on the wall and we can’t push them off when we think we are safe.

Guest Post: See Through Black Eyes by Leonce Gaiter

We know that when Darren Wilson and many of his defenders see a black man, they see someone who “looks like a demon,” and someone who has the extra/sub-human ability to “bulk up to run through” bullets.
We know this image of black men from an entire history of racist stereotypes. The image that Darren Wilson successfully invoked before the Missouri grand jury was the same image of monstrous black bucks lusting for white blood that propelled D.W. Griffith’s 1915 racist masterwork, “Birth of a Nation.”
Throughout American history, most images of blacks have been created and presented by whites—and throughout the overwhelming majority of this nation’s history, the nation and its people have been institutionally racist. Only for the past 50 years have blacks enjoyed laws aimed at granting us equal treatment under the law. For the previous 188, we lived as slaves and a sub-species of citizen.
However, throughout that history, blacks have developed our own images of whites, images buttressed not by the toxic stew of fear, hatred, and guilt that boils in white America’s kitchen, but by history and lived experience.
Imagine that my southern-born parents taught me that each white man or woman I encountered was a potential enemy, that each should be seen as someone who might deny me a job for which I was qualified, might deny me schooling, housing, freedom—even deny me my life.
Imagine they told me that whites often saw me through the twisted lens of a self-serving lie—the lie of my otherness, my laziness, my ignorance, of my propensity to violence—lies they told themselves to justify their vicious brutality, and their tolerance of it. Imagine I was told that to forget that in the face of the evidence would make me the basest kind of fool, deserving of whatever harm befell me at vicious white men’s hands.
Imagine that my striving, southern-born parents taught me that seeking equality with whites would be a demotion. A people who tolerated for centuries the enslavement of others, who enshrined chattel butchery in their founding documents, and then, most importantly, denied the existence of blood when their hands dripped with the stuff—these were not people with whom you sought parity. These were negative object lessons to whose depths you swore never to fall.
Imagine that my righteously angry southern-born parents taught me that the American Dream was for whites, that American justice was for white people, that Disney-esque happy endings were for white people.
Now, imagine that we’re not imagining. This is what my parents taught me—that every white man or woman was a creature that I should approach as I would a strange, stray dog, just as likely to bite your hand off as wag its tail. They taught me and my siblings to be wary at every encounter, and constantly steel ourselves against what ill will might erupt from white skin.
It worked. Like any good parents, ours prepared us for the world as it is, and by any standards, we are a highly accomplished set of children. I credit much of that to the hard lessons our parents taught us.
Now, imagine once more—this time that I, and those like me represent the majority, the state and its power, and that we have guns on our hips, badges on our chests, and the power to shoot you without consequence.
——–
Leonce Gaiter is a prolific African American writer and proud Harvard Alum. His writing has appeared in the NYTimes, NYT Magazine, LA Times, Washington Times, and Washington Post, and he has written two novels. His newly released novel, In the Company of Educated Men, (http://bit.ly/ZyqSuN) is a literary thriller with socio-economic, class, and racial themes.

Bill Cosby’s star defaced on Walk of Fame…do you think Cosby raped all these women?

cosby's star defaced
Is Bill Cosby a rapist? Is he a serial rapist? Did he rape underage girls? Everyday a new middle age woman is stepping up to the microphone and recounting her story, but did Cosby rape all of these women and did he also drug them? Why didn’t anyone speak up. Some of the women said he raped them in the “60s. In the “60s black men were still getting lynched for looking at white women and they stayed silent? What do you think?

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