Tag Archives: Mothers

Happy Mother’s Day to a Diverse Group of Women

Happy Mother’s Day to Moms, Grandmoms, Big mamas, Godmothers, Moms to be, women who yearn to be,and especially to Moms who have lost their moms. This is a diverse group of women and Mother’s Day affects them all very differently. During this time we are inundated with commercials featuring mom’s receiving breakfast in bed, twirling around in new dresses, receiving diamonds from their mates or simply frolicking in flower filled valleys. Life is beautiful for moms on Mother’s Day, and for many that will be the narrative of the day, but there will also be pain on that day and it is unfair to ignore that group of women. Many will grieve the loss of their mothers. Sure, they will have happy memories that will offer comfort, but their hearts still yearn for the physical smile of the mother that taught them so much. The other day I read this quote “my mother taught me everything except how to live without her”. So, if you know someone who has lost their mom give them a hug and they will appreciate it. Another group of women that are all but ignored are the women in your life who you know have been trying to become a mother and it has simply not happened. They deserve a hug and you can let them know they are in your prayers they need encouragement. Celebrate with the new moms by offering them some help long after the Mother’s Day holiday they will need it, and finally take the day to do whatever you want to do this day is yours enjoy and know that you are part of a group of women that have raised and are continuing to raise people who will rule the world. Happy Mother’s Day from Ebony Mom!

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The movie Fences left me “kinda shook”

Yesterday I went to see Fences. I have never seen the play so I cam in not knowing what to expect. What I got was a powerful movie full of family drama. Denzel Washington and Viola Davis should start clearing their shelves because both of them gave powerhouse performances worthy of awards. One of the stories was the relationship between the father and the son. The father who had never been fathered properly was now doing better than his father did but he still had twisted ideas that led to constant conflict between the father and the son. It made me think about the state of fatherhood now is this why so many fathers simply don’t get it because they really had no real role model or can you be a good father even if you did not have a good father? Share your thoughts.

Stephen A. Smith needs stop the tweet war with Ayesha Curry


Watch the clip and share yoxur thoughts.

Georgia Parents forgive sons who were trying to kill them…could you forgive?


Watch the clip and share your thoughts.

Dolls with Disabilities showcase differences

dolls with disabilities

http://www.today.com/parents/british-toymaker-makies-includes-disabled-dolls-t21676

Is Toya Graham the Mother of the Year?

By now everyone has seen the Baltimore mother, Toya Graham “beating” her son. She found him at Mondawmin Mall with a rock in his hand about to participate in the melee at the mall. She grabbed him their encounter has gone viral. Graham is being praised but why? it is interesting that we are witnessing appropriate situational parenting. I say this because if her son had merely been getting off a school bus, and she was using this same form of discipline against him for what she perceived to be wrong she would have been arrested. So the real question is “is corporal punishment wrong?” Or is appropriate in certain situations, and who determines what situation is appropriate? Share your thoughts.

Should Autism be Celebrated?

By Kim Stagliano (She has 3 autistic daughters)
Kim Stagliano has authored a novel and two books on parenting daughters with autism. She is managing editor of Age of Autism.

Today, you’ll be seeing a lot of blue: World monuments will be cast in blue lights, your co-workers will be wearing blue clothes, and companies will be hawking blue products. Why? April 2 is World Autism Awareness Day, when advocacy group Autism Speaks “celebrates” its international Light It Up Blue Campaign. But while you’ll be seeing blue everywhere, I’ll be seeing RED. The feel-good frippery of Light It Up Blue cloaks an often debilitating disorder in an air of festivity, with balloons, sparkling lights and pep rallies. The campaign implies autism is a party, rather than a crisis. For families living with autism, reality is far more sober, and their needs extend far beyond “awareness.”
I dread April, which has been designated as Autism Awareness Month. As mom to three young women with autism – ages 20, 18 and 14 – I eat, sleep and live autism every day. My youngest daughter, Bella, can’t speak a word and was abused on a school bus, leading to a criminal case. My oldest, Mia, had hundreds of grand mal seizures a year from ages 6 to 10. My middle child is wracked with anxiety. For all three, I have to cut their food, tend to their monthly feminine needs, and bathe them. They will need that daily living assistance forever; when I die, a stranger will have to do those things for them. That is why I bristle at the festive tone of April, the suggestion that the circumstances of my daughters’ existences are to be celebrated. For me, this should be a month of solemn acknowledgement and education about a global crisis. Yet, Autism Speaks talks about World Autism Awareness Day as an event that “celebrates the unique talents and skills of persons with autism.” I’m all for honoring the achievements of people with autism, but the term “unique talents and skills” hardly connotes a global crisis. That’s the tone increasingly used in conversations about this disorder. Some advocates suggest autism is advantageous – even a gift. Before backtracking on his comments last year, Jerry Seinfeld said he believed he was on the autism spectrum, casting it not as a disorder, but “an alternative mindset.” It made me angrier than the Soup Nazi. Let’s be clear: Autism is no walk in the park for those who have it, nor for their loved ones. The National Autism Association, the leader in autism safety information, reports that 48 percent of autistic children wander or run away from a safe environment, a rate nearly four times higher than their non-autistic siblings. Accidental drowning accounts for about 91 percent of deaths of autistic children under 14 years old after those wanderings. These children also face horrific bullying and teasing. For instance, an Ohio high school student with Asperger’s Syndrome, a type of autism, was the victim of an Ice Bucket Challenge “prank” (really, an assault) last year when three teens dumped a mixture of urine, tobacco and spit on his head. Even after high school, young adults with autism face a bleak quality of life, with lower employment rates than those with other disabilities. One study found that just 35 percent of autistic young adults had attended college and just 55 percent had been employed during their first six years after high school. I understand the impetus to raise awareness about autism. Much of the world does not think about autism 24-7 – at least not yet. Today, about one in 68 children is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, a sharp increase from the autism rate just a decade ago. It is the fastest growing developmental disorder, and MIT scientist Stephanie Seneff predicts half of children born in 2025 will be autistic. Certainly, a disorder so common deserves at least a month dedicated to educating people about its effects and raising money for critical social programs that can make autistic people’s lives happier, healthier and safer. But illuminating the Eiffel Tower in blue does more to promote an organization than to improve the lives of autistic people and their caretakers. Celebrating talents does little to educate the public on the intense challenges of the diagnosis and the tough aspects of living with the disability. What the autism community needs isn’t a party, but a sense of urgency and true crisis. They need advocates committed not only to getting them the acceptance they deserve, but also the critical help they require to survive, in the form of social programs, education, safety and employment opportunities.
If you’re compelled to contribute to Autism Awareness Month, I suggest you make a donation to a local organization that is actively helping families in your area. Instead of attending pep rallies and wearing blue bracelets, give to an organization that provides service dogs for autistic children orvolunteer as an autism buddy. If your child has a classmate on the spectrum, invite that classmate to your child’s next birthday party. You know that cashier at the grocery store who doesn’t look at you as she takes care of your order? Smile at her, even if she does not smile back. The best way we can support Autism Awareness Month is to turn it into AutismAction Month. People with autism deserve a bright – not just a blue – future.

Should all children receive the measles vaccine?

It is a yes or no question. As parents we make the health decisions concerning our children, but what if your decision has a detrimental effect on my child? Is that fair? I think children should be vaccinated what do you think?

Church cancels lesbian’s funeral 15 minutes before it was to start…were they wrong?

I first saw this story on Twitter. I found the link below. Church cancels the funeral because they objected to one of the images to be shown on a video presentation. The decedant was shown proposing to her wife. The family refused to remove the image so the church said you can’t have the funeral here. Were they right? Well you have to ask why wasn’t the tape reviewed earlier? You also would have to ask What Would Jesus Do? Would he have turned a grieving family out of the temple? The church definitely has a right to their own beliefs but why didn’t they use this as an opportunity to minister? They could have expressed their opposition to the lifestyle without dismissing the family. Share your thoughts.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2015/01/13/colorado-church-denies-funeral-for-lesbian-woman/21709363/

America Loved Honey Boo Boo and Family Until They Didn’t

Today while watching The Talk I was struck by the contempt America now holds for Mama June. If you don’t know her let me tell you a little about her. We met her when she was showcasing her daughter Honey Boo Boo on the child pageant circle. Her antics and the antics of her daughter captured the attention of America, and ultimately they were given their own show on TLC. We witnessed the family in all kinds of asinine situations. America laughed at them and not with them. The antics went on for years after Honey Boo Boo quit the pageant world. We met her siblings and her mother’s live in boyfriend. They appeared on talk shows and dispensed their homespun wisdom and dropped hilarious soundbites that the media slurped up like country syrup, but the other shoe fell when a convicted child molester came back into the life of Mama June, and the story became more tragic when one of the daughters revealed she was one of his victims. The laughter stopped and the finger pointing started. Mama June will appear on Entertainment Tonight today and she attempts to explain herself, but she is not prepared for the questions. The handlers are gone and she is alone in the sophisticated city and now she is being called uneducated, illiterate, but she has not changed from who she was when America met her. The difference is the TLC (The Learning Channel) has dropped her. They are no longer around to funnel out the information that supported the homespun narrative. She is on her own now left to face the music, and it is no Missouri Waltz.