Tag Archives: African Americans

Is it appropriate to take a selfie in front of an explosion?

inappropriate selfie

No it is not, but that did not stop this group. Two people died, 22 were injured and 100s were left homeless. Not a time to say cheese.

Should Autism be Celebrated?

By Kim Stagliano (She has 3 autistic daughters)
Kim Stagliano has authored a novel and two books on parenting daughters with autism. She is managing editor of Age of Autism.

Today, you’ll be seeing a lot of blue: World monuments will be cast in blue lights, your co-workers will be wearing blue clothes, and companies will be hawking blue products. Why? April 2 is World Autism Awareness Day, when advocacy group Autism Speaks “celebrates” its international Light It Up Blue Campaign. But while you’ll be seeing blue everywhere, I’ll be seeing RED. The feel-good frippery of Light It Up Blue cloaks an often debilitating disorder in an air of festivity, with balloons, sparkling lights and pep rallies. The campaign implies autism is a party, rather than a crisis. For families living with autism, reality is far more sober, and their needs extend far beyond “awareness.”
I dread April, which has been designated as Autism Awareness Month. As mom to three young women with autism – ages 20, 18 and 14 – I eat, sleep and live autism every day. My youngest daughter, Bella, can’t speak a word and was abused on a school bus, leading to a criminal case. My oldest, Mia, had hundreds of grand mal seizures a year from ages 6 to 10. My middle child is wracked with anxiety. For all three, I have to cut their food, tend to their monthly feminine needs, and bathe them. They will need that daily living assistance forever; when I die, a stranger will have to do those things for them. That is why I bristle at the festive tone of April, the suggestion that the circumstances of my daughters’ existences are to be celebrated. For me, this should be a month of solemn acknowledgement and education about a global crisis. Yet, Autism Speaks talks about World Autism Awareness Day as an event that “celebrates the unique talents and skills of persons with autism.” I’m all for honoring the achievements of people with autism, but the term “unique talents and skills” hardly connotes a global crisis. That’s the tone increasingly used in conversations about this disorder. Some advocates suggest autism is advantageous – even a gift. Before backtracking on his comments last year, Jerry Seinfeld said he believed he was on the autism spectrum, casting it not as a disorder, but “an alternative mindset.” It made me angrier than the Soup Nazi. Let’s be clear: Autism is no walk in the park for those who have it, nor for their loved ones. The National Autism Association, the leader in autism safety information, reports that 48 percent of autistic children wander or run away from a safe environment, a rate nearly four times higher than their non-autistic siblings. Accidental drowning accounts for about 91 percent of deaths of autistic children under 14 years old after those wanderings. These children also face horrific bullying and teasing. For instance, an Ohio high school student with Asperger’s Syndrome, a type of autism, was the victim of an Ice Bucket Challenge “prank” (really, an assault) last year when three teens dumped a mixture of urine, tobacco and spit on his head. Even after high school, young adults with autism face a bleak quality of life, with lower employment rates than those with other disabilities. One study found that just 35 percent of autistic young adults had attended college and just 55 percent had been employed during their first six years after high school. I understand the impetus to raise awareness about autism. Much of the world does not think about autism 24-7 – at least not yet. Today, about one in 68 children is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, a sharp increase from the autism rate just a decade ago. It is the fastest growing developmental disorder, and MIT scientist Stephanie Seneff predicts half of children born in 2025 will be autistic. Certainly, a disorder so common deserves at least a month dedicated to educating people about its effects and raising money for critical social programs that can make autistic people’s lives happier, healthier and safer. But illuminating the Eiffel Tower in blue does more to promote an organization than to improve the lives of autistic people and their caretakers. Celebrating talents does little to educate the public on the intense challenges of the diagnosis and the tough aspects of living with the disability. What the autism community needs isn’t a party, but a sense of urgency and true crisis. They need advocates committed not only to getting them the acceptance they deserve, but also the critical help they require to survive, in the form of social programs, education, safety and employment opportunities.
If you’re compelled to contribute to Autism Awareness Month, I suggest you make a donation to a local organization that is actively helping families in your area. Instead of attending pep rallies and wearing blue bracelets, give to an organization that provides service dogs for autistic children orvolunteer as an autism buddy. If your child has a classmate on the spectrum, invite that classmate to your child’s next birthday party. You know that cashier at the grocery store who doesn’t look at you as she takes care of your order? Smile at her, even if she does not smile back. The best way we can support Autism Awareness Month is to turn it into AutismAction Month. People with autism deserve a bright – not just a blue – future.

The Atlanta cheating scandal is a tragedy on so many levels

Yesterday my heart grieved as I saw Atlanta teachers and administrators being led off to prison. How did these college educated men and women get so far off track? They cheated. They cheated the students, the system and themselves and now they are going to prions, but we also have to ask were they also victims? Were they handed unrealistic goals to meet? I saw a clip of a 16 year old testifying against them and she said that she read at a middle school level, but the altered test results claimed she was at grade level. Was she a victim? Yes, but is that strictly the fault of the teachers? Shouldn’t her parents or parent have known that she was not up to par in her reading skills? Don’t get me wrong they should be punished and if they received bonuses they should have to return the money, but should they be sent to prison for years? These defendants were treated like they were members of the mafia. Punish them, but don’t destroy them. Do they really deserve to be roommates with rapists and murderers? Read the linked article and share your thoughts.

http://www.ajc.com/news/APS-trial-verdicts/

Did this Atlanta youth deserve a 2nd heart?

Read linked article and share your thoughts.
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/georgia-teen-who-got-donated-heart-dies-in-crime-spree-cops/ar-AAajise

Is everything acceptable?

We live in the era of acceptance. We accept everything. People can say or write anything without fear of reprisal. If they write or say anything you view as untrue the burden is on you to prove it to be untrue. People are free to say anything today and apologize tomorrow. The apology will go like this “if I offended anyone I am sorry.” Not I am sorry because I hurt your feelings. Yesterday Wendy Williams referred to a woman as a THOT. My daughter defined the acronym for me a few weeks ago (That Hoe Over There). Yes, this is a term that one woman used to describe another. Her words were greeted with laughter by an audience that is almost exclusively women. If you have ever been on Twitter you will see that people call people all manner of vile things all within the space of 140 characters. One would think people would be offended, but no they become a Twitter army when someone sparks a flame. Ask Jamie Foxx and Trevor Noah, they were recently scorched by the army. When they decide to take someone to task they don’t stop until you release the obligatory apology (see above for verbiage) via Twitter. So everything is not viewed as acceptable, but who decides what is not acceptable? Share your thoughts.

Will Trevor Noah be the latest to die death by 140 characters?

In this Twitter age people feel the need to share all aspects of their lives via Twitter. People in show business feel they have to  be funny and witty, but some of their tweets come back to haunt them. Yesterday Comedy Central anointed Trevor Noah as the successor to Jon Stewart. Somebody failed to cull through his Twitter history and now we are reading tweets that many deem offensive. Will Noah lose the job before he gets a chance to sit in the seat? Noah might just be one of the latest to convicted of Twitter suicide…death by 140 characters.

http://time.com/3764913/trevor-noah-twitter-backlash/

If the Stellar Awards are for gospel why is the big news the reunion of Destiny’s Child?

destiny's child

Are the Stellar Awards for gospel or is it just another award show? Share your thoughts.

#BlackBrunch ALT disrupts Palm Sunday Brunch…is this the path to change?

I love a good brunch. You get to sit back and simply enjoy the food, the drink and the company. It’s a peaceful time unless you are at this restaurant in Atlanta. Is this an acceptable form of protest. Watch the clip and share your thoughts.

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2015/03/30/black-brunch-protesters-hit-atlanta-on-palm-sunday-youre-scaring-the-children/

Roger Moore backpedaling after saying Idris Elba not “English-English” (in other words too black to be James Bond)

Read the linked article and share your thoughts.
http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/movies/roger-moore-idris-elba-bond-unrealistic-article-1.2165478

Oprah, why would you give a show to a man who has 34 children by 17 women?

This week I read that the OWN network is giving a show to a man who has 34 children by 17 women. The man appeared on Ivanyla’s show Fix My Life for 4 weeks. I can assume they received great ratings and that is the catalyst for giving this guy a show. He is being rewarded for his irresponsible decision making. When Oprah had her show she touted the fact that she wanted her shows to be uplifting, but apparently that is the thinking of a television host not a network owner. Ratings rule.

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