Category Archives: Ebony Mom Politics

What has Marco Rubio accomplished?


Morning Joe has been the official fan club of Donald Trump. Trump is able to do his call ins whenever he wants. They rarely challenge him they simply give Trump an AM platform. This morning Rick Santorum appeared on the show to say he was endorsing Marco Rubio. Usually an endorsement is an easy interview but Joe took the opportunity to act as the Grand Inquisitor. He asked Santorum to name one thing Rubio had accomplished while in the Senate. Santorum was stumped and when Joe smelled blood he went in for the kill. If it had been court it would have been badgering, if it were a fight the referee would have stopped it. It was beyond uncomfortable it was unfair and unwarranted. Some say the question was fair, but in this case the real question was was it necessary? Share your thoughts.

University of Chicago Jewish Fraternity Racist Emails leaked

Read the linked story and share your thoughts.

http://gawker.com/university-of-chicago-frat-bros-leaked-emails-are-super-1756912678?utm_campaign=socialflow_gawker_twitter&utm_source=gawker_twitter&utm_medium=socialflow

Did you see the BET Awards or was it Celebration of Gospel?

Can a show attract an audience if it only features gospel music? The answer is yes, but obviously BET does not believe it. They started sprinkling in R & B audiences in a few years ago, but now they are featured artists. It just seems a little odd to pair people singing songs of praise with people singing songs that are designed to sex you up.  R& B has its lane and Gospel should have its lane. I am just waiting to see a secular show incorporate gospel stars into the mix like celebration of Gospel did last night, but we know that is not going to happen. Share your thoughts on last night’s show.

Aretha Franklin’s Drop the “Mink” Moment at the Kennedy Center Honors


She is the Queen.

#NoJusticeNoLebron…should the superstar take a seat?

Activists are calling for Lebron James to sit out until there is justice for Tamir Rice. What do you think?

Going 2 Extremes in 2016

take your dream out of layaway
What does the word extreme mean? “Of a character or kind farthest removed from the ordinary or average”. (dictionary.com) Are you ready to perform beyond the ordinary or beyond average? That’s the question each of us should be asking ourselves as 2015 draws to a close. What are you willing to do? How far are you willing to go? The truth is there is nothing wrong with the ordinary or the average, but is that truly enough for you? Is 2016 going to be a carbon copy of 2015? We all have heard the statement “if you want something different you have to do something different”. Are you ready for different? Are you ready to stop talking about dreams and start making dreams realities? If yes is the answer you are ready for Take Your Dream Out of Layaway. http://www.amazon.com/Take-Your-Dream-out-Layaway/dp/1490898344/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1451404544&sr=1-1&keywords=take+your+dream+out+of+layaway

Ben Stein’s thoughts on the Holiday Trees

Interesting perspective that i agree with:

Ben Stein. Apparently the White House referred to Christmas Trees as Holiday Trees for the first time this year, which prompted Ben Stein, to say, on CBS Sunday Morning:
My confession: I am a Jew, and every single one of my ancestors was Jewish. And it does not bother me even a little bit when people call those beautiful lit up, bejewelled trees, Christmas trees. I don’t feel threatened. I don’t feel discriminated against. That’s what they are, Christmas trees.

It doesn’t bother me a bit when people say, ‘Merry Christmas’ to me. I don’t think they are slighting me or getting ready to put me in a ghetto. In fact, I kind of like it. It shows that we are all brothers and sisters celebrating this happy time of year. It doesn’t bother me at all that there is a manger scene on display at a key intersection near my beach house in Malibu. If people want a nativity scene, it’s just as fine with me as is the Menorah a few hundred yards away.

I don’t like getting pushed around for being a Jew, and I don’t think Christians like getting pushed around for being Christians. I think people who believe in God are sick and tired of getting pushed around, period. I have no idea where the concept came from, that America is an explicitly atheist country. I can’t find it in the Constitution and I don’t like it being shoved down my throat.

Or maybe I can put it another way: where did the idea come from that we should worship celebrities and we aren’t allowed to worship God? I guess that’s a sign that I’m getting old, too. But there are a lot of us who are wondering where these celebrities came from and where the America we knew went to.

In light of the many jokes we send to one another for a laugh, this is a little different: This is not intended to be a joke; it’s not funny, it’s intended to get you thinking.

Billy Graham’s daughter was interviewed on the Early Show and Jane Clayson asked her ‘How could God let something like this happen?’ (regarding Hurricane Katrina). Anne Graham gave an extremely profound and insightful response. She said, ‘I believe God is deeply saddened by this, just as we are, but for years we’ve been telling God to get out of our schools, to get out of our government and to get out of our lives.And being the gentleman He is, I believe He has calmly backed out. How can we expect God to give us His blessing and His protection if we demand He leave us alone?’

In light of recent events… terrorist attacks, school shootings, etc. I think it started when Madeleine Murray O’Hare (she was murdered, her body found a few years ago) complained she didn’t want prayer in our schools, and we said OK. Then someone said you better not read the Bible in school. The Bible says thou shalt not kill; thou shalt not steal, and love your neighbor as yourself. And we said OK.

Then Dr. Benjamin Spock said we shouldn’t spank our children when they misbehave, because their little personalities would be warped and we might damage their self-esteem (Dr. Spock’s son committed suicide). We said an expert should know what he’s talking about. And we said okay.

Now we’re asking ourselves why our children have no conscience, why they don’t know right from wrong, and why it doesn’t bother them to kill strangers, their classmates, and themselves.

Probably, if we think about it long and hard enough, we can figure it out. I think it has a great deal to do with ‘WE REAP WHAT WE SOW.’

Funny how simple it is for people to trash God and then wonder why the world’s going to hell.
Funny how we believe what the newspapers say, but question what the Bible says.

Funny how you can send ‘jokes’ through e-mail and they spread like wildfire, but when you start sending messages regarding the Lord, people think twice about sharing.

Funny how lewd, crude, vulgar and obscene articles pass freely through cyberspace, but public discussion of God is suppressed in the school and workplace.

Are you laughing yet?

Funny how when you forward this message, you will not send it to many on your address list because you’re not sure what they believe, or what they will think of you for sending it.

Funny how we can be more worried about what other people think of us than what God thinks of us.

Pass it on if you think it has merit.

If not, then just discard it…. no one will know you did. But, if you discard this thought process, don’t sit back and complain about what a bad shape the world is in.

My Best Regards, Honestly and respectfully,

Ben Stein

Are the Obamas getting a little too thirsty?


The President recently appeared on reality television and Mrs. Obama is a frequent guest on shows like Ellen? Are they spreading themselves a little thin? Are they starting to appear thirsty? Share your thoughts.

Black Lives Matter, but does that also apply to black folks that work at stores?

Black Lives Matter closed some stores at the Mall of America yesterday. They disrupted the day after Thanksgiving shopping on Chicago’s Magnificent Mile. They are disrupting commerce and that gets media attention, and from the business community. So would their activities be defined as successful? What about the people who work at these stores do their lives matter? Who will help them pay their bills or buy gifts for their families? Share your thoughts.

Founded in 1776, a Historic Black Church Challenges the Nation to Ring a Long-Stilled Bell

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 23, 2015

Against a contemporary backdrop of racial tension, Colonial Williamsburg to restore a church bell silent since segregation and let it ring for freedom for all of Black History Month

WILLIAMSBURG , Va. – In 1776, the year of America’s independence, a group of slaves secretly founded the First Baptist Church in Williamsburg, Virginia. The church, which celebrates its 240th anniversary in 2016, is today one of the country’s oldest African-American houses of Baptist worship[1], and a symbol of the faith, struggle, and perseverance that marks the black experience in America. The First Baptist Church — whose first members met under thatched arbors in the woods — later moved to a church building and acquired a bell in the late 19th century. Since the days of segregation and Jim Crow, the bell has been inoperable…unheard throughout the tumult and progress of the civil rights movement and in the presence of famed worshipers including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks. The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, which has played a key role in building the church at the current site, has pledged to restore the bell to working condition and to challenge the nation to ring it throughout the day — every day — for Black History Month in February 2016.

“Bells call people to faith. They send folks forth to do good work in the world,” said Reginald F. Davis, Pastor of First Baptist Church. “But Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who prayed in our church, also said that freedom rings. A silent bell represents unfinished work of freedom and equality. This bell, in this sacred and historic church, will be silent no more.”

An engineering and conservation team led by Colonial Williamsburg experts is already on site at the church to determine the age, foundry, and provenance of the bell, and to begin the painstaking process of restoring it in time for it to toll throughout Black History Month.

“We are going to challenge the nation, Americans of every color, faith, and creed, to take a turn at the bell rope,” said Mitchell B. Reiss, president and CEO of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. “This church and this bell follow the arc of the American story unlike any symbol in the nation. The church was founded in America’s year of independence, but this was a dream deferred for far too many. As a nation we constantly strive to form a more perfect union, based on liberty, rule of law, and human dignity, and as current events remind us, that work is forever unfinished.”

Black History Month also will be honored by Colonial Williamsburg, the First Baptist Church, and The College of William & Mary with an unprecedented range of special programs offered daily during the month of February. This will include a new exhibition at the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, A Century of African-American Quilts; daily lectures and live theater throughout the historic area; concerts, film festivals, oral histories; and gospel music and church services at the First Baptist Church. One of Colonial Williamsburg’s full-time interpreters — James Ingram — portrays the first pastor of First Baptist Church, the slave preacher Rev. Gowan Pamphlet.

“Colonial Williamsburg is in the story-telling business,” said Ingram. “We tell the story of America, including our arduous journeys through prejudice and injustice. We want people to come and take their turn at the bell rope, to take their place in the American story, and to help heal the nation of the divides that remain among us.”

Colonial Williamsburg’s conservation efforts at First Baptist Church will go beyond those for the bell itself. In addition, Colonial Williamsburg’s conservation team will clean and conserve several historic communion vessels owned by the church, as well as conserve two marble carved gravestones from 1851 and 1866 that marked the graves of two free blacks buried in Williamsburg.

“Colonial Williamsburg is pleased to bring its conservation expertise to bear on the preservation of these important artifacts, which help to illustrate the deep and rich history of Williamsburg’s African-American community,” said Ronald L. Hurst, Colonial Williamsburg’s vice president for collections, conservation, and museums and its Carlisle H. Humelsine chief curator.

The Let Freedom Ring challenge is made possible in part by a generous grant from the Ford Foundation of New York.

For more information, or to reserve your spot at the rope please visit LetFreedomRingChallenge.org

Media contact:
Shawn Dhanak
517-449-0402
Shawn@marcglobalcommunications.com

About First Baptist Church

The First Baptist Church of Williamsburg originated in the 1700’s with a quest by courageous slaves and free black worshipers who simply wanted to worship God in their own way. In their search, they left the church of the slave owners, Bruton Parish, where worship was restrained and segregated, and built the first brush arbor at Green Spring Plantation to gather secretly in song and prayer. Worshipers soon moved to a more convenient spot, Raccoon Chase, where Robert F. Coles, a compassionate white landowner in Williamsburg, inspired by the worshipers’ stirring songs and soulful prayers, offered the use of his Carriage House on Nassau Street as a meeting place sometime in 1776. The Reverend Moses, an enslaved person, served as preacher to the worshipers until his passing in 1791. His prodigy, Rev. Gowan Pamphlet, returned to the community and led the congregation of the “African Baptist Church” until his death in 1810. A new African Baptist Church was built across from the Carriage House and dedicated in May 1856, later to be named First Baptist Church in Williamsburg in 1863. The present location at 727 Scotland Street has served as home since 1956.

About the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation preserves, restores and operates Virginia’s 18th-century capital of Williamsburg. Innovative and interactive experiences, such as the street theater Revolutionary City® and the RevQuest: Save the Revolution!TM series of technology-assisted alternate reality games, highlight the relevance of the American Revolution to contemporary life and the importance of an informed, active citizenry. The Colonial Williamsburg experience includes more than 400 restored or reconstructed original buildings, renowned museums of decorative arts and folk art, extensive educational outreach programs for students and teachers, lodging, culinary options from historic taverns to casual or elegant dining, the Golden Horseshoe Golf Club featuring 45 holes designed by Robert Trent Jones and his son Rees Jones, a full-service spa and fitness center, pools, retail stores and gardens. Philanthropic support and revenue from admissions, products and hospitality operations sustain Colonial Williamsburg’s educational programs and preservation initiatives.

[1] A small number of black Baptist churches can legitimately claim to be the oldest in America — First African Baptist in Savannah, Ga., for example, and Silver Bluff Baptist Church in Jackson, S.C. However, First Baptist Church in Williamsburg is believed to be the first black Baptist church that was organized entirely by African Americans.
Shawn Dhanak

Media Relations Manager, Let Freedom Ring Campaign

Shawn@marcglobalcommunications.com

517-449-0402

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