Why didn’t Penn State officials call the police on Jerry Sandusky?

From the Second Mile WebsiteMany children face adversity even before they understand how to dream. The Second Mile, founded in 1977 in State College, Pennsylvania, is a statewide non-profit organization for children who need additional support and who would benefit from positive human contact. The Second Mile plans, organizes, and offers activities and programs for children – and adults who work with them – to promote self-confidence as well as physical, academic, and personal success.
Jerry Sandusky former Penn State football assistant coach is accused of abusing boys, many who were a part of the Second Mile foundation, on the grounds of the university. As early as 2002 he was spotted by a graduate assistant engaging in sex with a young boy. So did the graduate assistant call the police no he told the real head of the sports department legendary coach Joe Paterno. So Paterno called the police. No, he told the athletic director. If you saw someone abusing a child wouldn’t you call the police? This situation was mishandled from the jump. Sandusky was a member of the club and he was protected, but finally this alleged predator has been stopped. One has to wonder if these children had not been under-priviledged and had been members of Sandusky’s own community would these allegations have come to light sooner?
http://msn.foxsports.com/collegefootball/story/Curley-Schultz-step-down-amid-Penn-State-sex-abuse-scandal-110611

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Comments

  • Cyndi  On November 13, 2011 at 2:28 pm

    I am appalled by the lack of concern for that poor child being sodomized in the shower. Someone could have stopped it, but instead said nothing and walked out. Organizations, such as Second Mile, are suppose to lift a child by showing and giving them life’s positive opportunities. Yet, the likes of Sandusky continue to exploit and destroy children while others stand idly by through silence. When will our children’s safety take precedence over the fear of a public scandal? A quote that has been attributed to Edmund Burke comes to mind, “All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.”

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